Free Read [Spirituality Book] ☆ Newton's Apple and Other Myths about Science - by Kostas Kampourakis Ronald L. Numbers ↠


  • Title: Newton's Apple and Other Myths about Science
  • Author: Kostas Kampourakis Ronald L. Numbers
  • ISBN: 9780674967984
  • Page: 367
  • Format: Hardcover

  • A falling apple inspired the law of gravity or so the story goes Is it true Perhaps not But why do such stories endure as explanations of how science happens Newton s Apple and Other Myths about Science brushes away popular misconceptions to provide a clearer picture of scientific breakthroughs from ancient times to the present.A falling apple inspired Isaac Newton s iA falling apple inspired the law of gravity or so the story goes Is it true Perhaps not But why do such stories endure as explanations of how science happens Newton s Apple and Other Myths about Science brushes away popular misconceptions to provide a clearer picture of scientific breakthroughs from ancient times to the present.A falling apple inspired Isaac Newton s insight into the law of gravity or so the story goes Is it true Perhaps not But the intriguing question is why such stories endure as explanations of how science happens Newton s Apple and Other Myths about Science brushes away popular misconceptions to provide a clearer picture of great scientific breakthroughs from ancient times to the present.Among the myths refuted in this volume is the idea that no science was done in the Dark Ages, that alchemy and astrology were purely superstitious pursuits, that fear of public reaction alone led Darwin to delay publishing his theory of evolution, and that Gregor Mendel was far ahead of his time as a pioneer of genetics Several twentieth century myths about particle physics, Einstein s theory of relativity, and are discredited here as well In addition, a number of broad generalizations about science go under the microscope of history the notion that religion impeded science, that scientists typically adhere to a codified scientific method, and that a bright line can be drawn between legitimate science and pseudoscience.Edited by Ronald Numbers and Kostas Kampourakis, Newton s Apple and Other Myths about Science debunks the widespread belief that science advances when individual geniuses experience Eureka moments and suddenly comprehend what those around them could never imagine Science has always been a cooperative enterprise of dedicated, fallible human beings, for whom context, collaboration, and sheer good luck are the essential elements of discovery.
    Kostas Kampourakis Ronald L. Numbers
    My new book is titled Turning Points , and it will be published by Prometheus books in early 2018.My previous book, titled Making Sense of Genes , was published by Cambridge University Press in early 2017 My book Understanding Evolution Cambridge University Press, 2014 was selected as a 2015 Choice Outstanding Academic Title I have edited The Philosophy of Biology a Companion for Educators Springer 2013 , and co edited, with Ron Numbers, Newton s Apple and Other Myths about Science Harvard University Press, 2015 I am currently co editing, with Michael Reiss, a book on biology didactics that will be published by Routledge.


    Commentaires:

    Dave
    The low grade I give this book is my own perception, of course. Someone with a more scientific background will probably appreciate it much more. Still, I do read a fair number of science books, but this one was just too dense for this layman. Also, I think the synopsis on the inside cover over promised. While I enjoyed most of the essays mentioned there, the vast majority in the book concerned myths that were totally obscure to me. Of the 27 myths debunked, there were probably seven or eight tha [...]

    Michael Norwitz
    Short essays covering a variety of popular myths about science. They range widely in quality some clear and revelatory, others vague and muddled. There is a lot to learn from this book, although a more compelling writing style would bring me back to reread it more often.

    Jeremy
    Short authoritative essays on myths of science. Really excellent read. I learned quite bit, and the short nature of the essays was perfect to "snack" on over my summer break.

    Andrea
    Couldn't finish this book. It was too disjointed for me to enjoy.

    Rupinder
    1.5 stars.I really had high hopes from this book, and really wanted to enjoy it. But as is evident from my low rating, there were a few strong reasons that I ended up almost disliking it.1. The writing is soporific and dry. Man, it's been a while since I had to struggle with my inner demons just to keep my eyes on the page.2. Lots of logical fallacies (most common being the straw man) combined with misrepresentations of arguments in order to make them seem like scientific myths in need of debunk [...]

    Keith
    Mostly interesting book on science myths commonly held (like people believed the earth was flat at time of Columbus or that Newton was hit in the head with an apple and came up with gravity).I got lost in the details a bit and some parts were slow for me, but still worthwhile. Skimmed the last third of it. I'm not really into science that much, but I have responsibility in that area at my library work.

    Laura Mitchell
    More of a resource book than a casual reading book, but it is very useful to "debunk" the various science myths presented. A strong demonstration of why trying to distill any scientific position into a "sound bite" is significantly flawed.

    Sara
    I got about halfway through this book when I began to completely lose interest. It happened abruptly, when I got to the section of the book where I had some background knowledge. Afterwards I couldn't read the rest of the myths in the same light. Most of the myths in this book were either too obscure to be relatable or relevant to me in any way, or were myths I knew about but already knew them to be false so in that case are they really even myths anymore? Others it seemed the authors were being [...]

    Socraticgadfly
    Good nuances here to some myths, and their refutation. I would quibble about just how scientific pre-modern alchemy and astrology actually were. That essay seemed to be straining at gnats. The several essays tackling various myths related to the neo-Darwinian synthesis were the best for me. While I do claim that I didn't really learn anything new on myths of physics, or medieval science, there were a few points of interest here in the biology ones.Others, like the essay near the end on the "dema [...]

    Keli
    As a science fangirl, I found this book to be right up my alley. For the most part, the myths were well chosen. And, thanks to the structure of the book, I was able to skip the parts that didn't interest me. I was especially interested in the early part of the book that addressed the Middle Ages. The more modern myths sometimes got a bit too obscure to interest someone who's not really in that field. For the most part, the writing was solid. However, I did find one chapter to be downright cringe [...]

    Jason Gordon
    This is a very entertaining and enlightening book. I will say that I knew that many of the debunked myths were indeed false and used for incredibly propagandistic purposes. What was interesting and much appreciated were how those myths actually became enduring false histories. Of course it also doesn't hurt that this is some of the most accessible science writing and the source list is quite decent. I'd definitely recommend it.

    Cleokatra
    I read a lot of nonfiction. This is the most tedious books I've read in a long time. The chapters were all written by different authors and some chapters are better than others. I found that the boring, repetitive chapters outweighed the interesting, enlightening chapters. For that reason, I really can't recommend the book.

    Donna
    I like my science fact with a little humor. This was pretty dry which is why it took a month to finish it. Still, learned a bit, although some of these myths would seem unlikely to anyone with a reasoning mind any way.

    Elaine
    This was a bit dense for me, and most of these myths I already knew were false. The history of how the myths came about seemed long and overly explained. I gave up on this one after a few chapters and skimmed.

    David Kessler
    This book is unfulling and weak. Obviously when you are talking about a questionable myth or sentence you might be able to argue both sides of the coin. This book created some flimsy myths and then found authors to write about each one. I learned very little from reading this book.

    Jim Corson
    An interesting read, but dry writting

    • Free Read [Spirituality Book] ☆ Newton's Apple and Other Myths about Science - by Kostas Kampourakis Ronald L. Numbers ↠
      367 Kostas Kampourakis Ronald L. Numbers
    • thumbnail Title: Free Read [Spirituality Book] ☆ Newton's Apple and Other Myths about Science - by Kostas Kampourakis Ronald L. Numbers ↠
      Posted by:Kostas Kampourakis Ronald L. Numbers
      Published :2019-08-04T03:33:19+00:00