[PDF] Download ↠ Dresda | by ¶ Frederick Taylor


  • Title: Dresda
  • Author: Frederick Taylor
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 429
  • Format: Paperback

  • At 9.51 p.m on Tuesday 13 February 1945, Dresden s air raid sirens sounded as they had done many times during the Second World War But this time was different By the next morning, than 4,500 tons of high explosives and incendiary devices had been dropped on the unprotected city.At least 25,000 inhabitants died in the terrifying firestorm and thirteen square miles oAt 9.51 p.m on Tuesday 13 February 1945, Dresden s air raid sirens sounded as they had done many times during the Second World War But this time was different By the next morning, than 4,500 tons of high explosives and incendiary devices had been dropped on the unprotected city.At least 25,000 inhabitants died in the terrifying firestorm and thirteen square miles of the city s historic centre, including incalculable quantities of treasure and works of art, lay in ruins In this portrait of the city, its people, and its still controversial destruction, Frederick Taylor has drawn on archives and sources only accessible since the fall of the East German regime, and talked to Allied aircrew and survivors, from members of the German armed services and refugees fleeing the Russian advance to ordinary citizens of Dresden.
    Frederick Taylor
    Frederick Taylor is a British novelist and historian specialising in modern German history.He was educated at Aylesbury Grammar School and read History and Modern Languages at Oxford University He did postgraduate work at Sussex University on the rise of the extreme right in Germany in the early twentieth century Before embarking on the series of historical monographs for which he is best known, he translated The Goebbels Diaries 1939 1941 into English and wrote novels set in Germany.


    Commentaires:

    4triplezed
    After “…the German bombing of Coventry” the author, Frederick Taylor writes “The damage inflicted on the cities infrastructure had lasted far longer and caused more long-term difficulties for war production than the actual bombing of the industrial plants” This statement on page 188 of my copy was constantly on my mind while reading this very good book on the appalling tragedy that was the bombing of Dresden on 13th, 14th and 15th February 1945.The thought of the allies learning from t [...]

    César Lasso
    Empecé este libro porque quería documentarme sobre Dresde, la ciudad de la antigua Alemania del Este donde he estudiado alemán en julio y agosto. No ha sido una lectura seguida: a finales de junio avancé bastante pero en los dos meses siguientes, como estudiante y turista y divirtiéndome por vacaciones, toqué poco esta obra.Me ha parecido un trabajo de divulgación excelentemente documentado y razonado, constando al final una extensa bibliografía. Sin embargo, se me ha hecho un poco largo [...]

    Matt
    Wow! 6/5 stars!This account and discussion of one of the most controversial things that the Allies committed in the Second World War is chilling.Which ever side of the fence you sit, read this book before you comment or opine. The last chapter provoked me to think again on what I believe.War is wrong and I hope that I never have to make any decisions that these people involved had to. Hindsight is a wonderful and privileged thing. Go in peace.

    Theresa
    Well rounded history of the controversial bombing of Dresden between February 13 and 15, 1945. The allies showered Dresden with 3,900 tons of high-explosive bombs and incendiary devices, resulting in a horrendous firestorm killing up to 25,000 (per the more reasonable, non-German propagandist estimates released immediately after the bombing). Some say the "Florence on the Elbe" should not have been targeted such, especially the populous city center. Others say The attacks were fully justified, a [...]

    Michael Flanagan
    I well rounded look at the fire bombing of Dresden, one of the more controversial of the Allies Air Campaign over Germany. The author brings the vibrancy of the city to the pages. By telling the history of the iconic Saxon city and its people right up to the day of the bombing.Frederick Taylor then leads us into the hell of the night and following days, letting the people who lived through it tell their stories. Along with this he also tells the story of the people involved and their reasons beh [...]

    KerryH
    As someone who has spent a great deal of her professional life teaching in the broader category of World War II, I am well aware of the way that the whole question of the bombing campaign carried out by Britain over Germany while under the command of Arthur (Bomber) Harris has polarised public opinion.I fully support the conclusions reached by Taylor in his book, the raid was justified. Britain was at war, I repeat, Britain was at war with Germany. Following Dunkirk, the only way that Britain co [...]

    R Helen
    I think Taylor's account of the bombing of Dresden is probably the most objective and authoritative account you'll possibly find. He examines all the evidence and sifts though all the rumors to get to the real story of what happened on that night 13-14 February, 1945. He begins with a history of this once beautiful city before recounting its place in the German Reich under Hitler. Despite the popular understanding of Dresden as no more than a cultural center of Western Europe, it actually contai [...]

    William
    If you want details on every aspect of the February 1945 Dresden raid, I recommend this book. Only about 60% of the book seems to be on the actual event, however, because the author takes a broad view of the topic and provides a large amount of historical background to the city as well as its post-war developments. A few more maps would have helped the reader make sense of some of the detailed author and eyewitness accounts of the events at street level. The facts and the myths of the raid are e [...]

    James
    On the morning of February 13 1945, Dresden was in full flower. For centuries, the capital of Saxony had been enticing visitors from near and far to sample its delights: sumptuous royal palaces, glorious churches, a pleasing climate and a thriving cultural scene. Not for nothing was Dresden known as "Florence on the Elbe". Even the worst of the Second World War appeared to have skirted Dresden in deference to its charms. The mighty cities of Hamburg and Berlin, Leipzig and Cologne had not escape [...]

    Peter Mcloughlin
    Dresden was bombed on February 13th 1945 on Shrove Tuesday (Mardi Gras in New Orleans). The bombing was so intense it caused a firestorm which destroyed the city. Both British and American bombers attacked that night and early morning the next day. Dresden however was not an open city of no military value senselessly attacked. While the morals of bombing cities as military targets is certainly a dubious proposition that was the practice on both sides. Dresden was a beautiful baroque city but it [...]

    TR Peterson
    Taylor's book on Dresden is really three books in one - a history of Saxony, a history of aerial bombardment and finally a history of the bombing of Dresden in the Second World War. He would have done well to only write the final book. One doesn't get to the actual event until halfway through the book which makes for an at time tedious read. In addition, Taylor uses a lot of cliches and statement which insult the reader's intelligence such as when he tells us the invention of the airplane change [...]

    Dave
    Review originally published at Book of Bogan.The bombing of Dresden during the Second World War has become one of those events which have brought into question the 'righteousness' of some of the Allies actions in that conflict. It does seem strange, however, that this one incident should have drawn such ire, in a war where a thousand other outrages occurred. This book seeks not only to examine what occurred on that fateful night, and the following day, but to unpack some of the mythology, and pr [...]

    Catherine
    I bought this book in a bookstore in Dresden, itself. Having visited the city as part of a recent trip to Germany, I was mesmerized by its beauty and haunted by its past. I had to learn more. In particular, I wanted a better factual framework for tackling the long debated question of whether the allied bombing of Dresden, at the end of the war, when Germany was all but defeated, was justified. Taylor's book provided that framework and so much more. Not only does he artfully tackle the moral ques [...]

    Christi
    This was a hard and dry book-definitely very academic! It's a fantastic book and very well researched. It presents a lot of political thoughts and viewpoints, and lots of anecdotes and individual stories as well. It's a great read and very interesting, but full confession: I ran out of time and had to skim the last half. Not needing such an in-depth look at the Dresden bombing I won't be checking out the book again, but I'd definitely recommend it to anyone wanting to know about the Dresden bomb [...]

    Jerry Young
    I know embarrassingly little about WWII beyond the broad outlines, one of those being the firebombing of Dresden. This book describes the firebombing in full, heartbreaking, detail. But it's not just a documentary of the event. Taylor, while in no way downplaying the tragedy, makes a convincing case for Dresden as a legitimate wartime target. In explaining the circumstances leading up to 02/13/45, you also get a brief history of the Saxony region, of air war (especially the British Bomber Comman [...]

    Faith McLellan
    A masterful account of a significant and deeply troubling event. Having been in Dresden last weekend, I felt I at least had educated myself a bit on this seminal day (or 3 days, or forever, depending on how you look at it) in world history. So well-written, with many eyewitness accounts and other evidently carefully chosen primary sources. Highly recommended.

    Jim
    This book is well worth reading. The unification of Germany allowed access to many records that were previously unavailable to western historians as well as to many survivors. This is as an objective and balanced history of the bombing of Dresden as you're going to find. The author takes great pains in presenting and debunking many of the myths that sprung up over the years.You learn a lot about the history of Dresden,"Florence on the Elbe." The city was famous worldwide for its architecture and [...]

    Tim Mitchell
    This is a good summary but it falls between a number of different stools. There are better accounts on the evolution of area bombing (for example, the series by Martin Middlebrook) and it doesn't properly address the most interesting question; what makes Dresden an 'atrocity' with so many candidates.As Taylor points out, part of that is the nature of Area Bombing and Harris' unapologetic personality; he also made the mistake of continually promising more than he could deliver. That hardly makes [...]

    BC
    This isn't a bad book, it just seems to be missing a few things. Overall, it does a good job of first describing the events that took place in Dresden in Februarty, 1945, and then of secondly looking at the ways people remember the firebombing of Dresden. Taylor does a reasonable enough job of debunking the myths surounding both the event (that Allied planes actively attacked civilians with machine-guns) and the city (that it had no industry, and was essentially a militarily useless open-city). [...]

    Rob Kitchin
    The flattening and firestorm of Dresden on the night of the 13th February and morning of the 14th of February 1945 continues to generate controversy. For many it has become a symbol of the extent to which the Western Allies overstepped the mark from a morally righteous war campaign to wanton destruction and mass murder. For others, Dresden was a legitimate target; a key transport node and a centre for armaments production and administration, and the next city that the Russians would face as thei [...]

    Sophie
    This is an excellent introduction to what really happened at Dresden on February 13th, 1945. It puts the bombing into context, in terms of how it came to be contemplated and carried out by British Bomber Command, and also puts to rest several of the Dresden myths inflated by Goebbels & later the GDR Communist regime (that it had been a city with no military industries, that there were half a million refugees in the city at that time, that phosphor bombs were used). Most valuable I think for [...]

    Mark
    One of the great horrors of WWII was area/"terror" bombing - and for years, pundits & propagandists have pointed to the bombing of Dresden, Germany (and the devastating firestorm that ensued) by the RAF and 8th Air Force (US) as justification that the Allies were no better than the Nazis - that there was some kind of moral equivalence because Dresden was a "non-military target."Frederick Taylor's book on the bombing of Dresden uses cold, hard facts to dispel this fanciful notion of an "innoc [...]

    Dwight
    Very informative and answered many questions I have entertained for years with regard to selection of Dresden as a legitimate wartime target. Taylor did not shy away from controversy and even accounted for conflicting testimony, even when it went against the Allied side. He exposed "Bomber" Harris for the person he was, and the effects of war on both politicians and military alike. He was particularly critical of the lack of political will on the part of politicians in lending tacit approval of [...]

    WW2 Reads
    Taylor's book on Dresden is really three books in one - a history of Saxony, a history of aerial bombardment and finally a history of the bombing of Dresden in the Second World War. He would have done well to only write the final book. One doesn't get to the actual event until halfway through the book which makes for an at time tedious read. In addition, Taylor uses a lot of cliches and statement which insult the reader's intelligence such as when he tells us the invention of the airplane change [...]

    Simon
    I found this book a bit annoying at first as it seemed the author was attempting to set up an argument justifying this most infamous of RAF raids but as the narrative continued a cohesive and unbiased account emerged. A fairly thorough background history of Dresden and Saxony is presented leading up to the Nazi's coming to power as well as a look at the industrial and commercial role of Dresden in the reich. An indepth look at the raid from many perspectives lends clarity to the events while att [...]

    Steven
    Very well-written and well-researched account of the the infamous Allied bombing of Dresden in the final stages of WWII. Printed in 2005 and drawing on a host of sources, including interviews of eyewitnesses and what the author considers to be a quite authoritative German book on the topic that hasn't been translated to English, the author comes to the same conclusion as the recent headlines: the death toll was likely only 25-40,000.The book is chock full of excellent observations on the bombing [...]

    John Gordon
    A thorough account of the firestorm bombing of Dresden in 1945 from the perspectives of those in the air and on the ground. I thought that the history of the city was unnecessarily lengthy and that perhaps the review of the war in the air to date was not really required. However this material provides good background material for those not already read up on the subject.The bombing action itself was remarkably rapid and effective, thanks in part to good weather and a lack of German defensive eff [...]

    Kenneth
    I would call this a must read for any serious student of World War II history. Frederick Taylor has the benefit to draw on archives and sources only accessible since the fall of the East German regime in 1989. He could therefore verify claims as to the extent of bombing damage and the estimated number killed on the ground. Taylor succeeds in cutting through the politics that have beclouded the events in 1945. Just as the clouds obscured some of the pilots' view of the great city, these political [...]

    Marc Dauphin
    This definitely not the final book on this subject. there are, however some very interesting facts and observations here and there in the book.Twenty years ago, when I set out to write a novel about Germans during WW II, I interviewed a number of ex-Bomber Command crewmembers in my town. The first thing they wanted to tell me was to make sure that I knew that they had had nothing to do with Dresden.That was enough to set my fictional family in that city. Throughout the years, I have grown closer [...]

    Miranda Ruth
    Very difficult and emotive subject handled well. I learned a lot about the rules of war, and the arguments (pretty powerful) that the Allies broke them on this occasion, possibly by malign fate as well as design since the conditions that night were ideal for a firestorm and the scale of the resulting conflagration seemed to amaze even them. However, there was credible evidence that the Nazi argument that Dresden was an entirely civilian target was manifestly incorrect.It is all too easy to judge [...]

    • [PDF] Download ↠ Dresda | by ¶ Frederick Taylor
      429 Frederick Taylor
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      Posted by:Frederick Taylor
      Published :2019-09-10T03:11:38+00:00